Friday, March 04, 2011

Arty farty in Wellington

So the week after the week after Canterbury Faire was my annual trip to Wellington for the WebStock conference. I've been fabulously lucky in that my employer has seen fit to approve (and pay for) my going to every WebStock conference since the very first one. They never disappoint and this one was no different. I have made a couple of blogs about it on the libraries' professional interest blog Bibliofile so I am not going to repeat them here. I try to use the little free time that I have in Wellington to visit a few art galleries and do a little shopping, although having had a couple of heavy spending months I TRIED not to spend too much.

So, art... my first trip was to the Wellington City Gallery which is conveniently located opposite the WebStock site the Wellington Town hall. On my first visit there were two excellent exhibitions, one, The Vault by Neil Pardington which was a fascinating group of photographs of the storage facilities of New Zealand Museums. This was especially interesting to me because I remember touring the Canterbury Museum as a child and we were allowed in the back rooms and there was so much fascinating stuff.
The other was a display of the work of illustrator Graham Percy: The Imaginative Life and Times of Graham. Percy. I particularly liked his re-imagined history group which put historical personalities into anachronistic settings, often based in New Zealand.

I also made it to Te Papa for the European Masters exhibition. This was also great BUT... it hadn't been advertised very well that it was only 19th & 20th century works from a single German gallery. Now for me 19th & 20th century is modern art - its nice but it doesn't get me excited. If I hadn't been a bit in 'holiday' mode I probably wouldn't have paid the $20 entrance fee. Finally I went back to the City Gallery for the Crown Lynn exhibition. Crown Lynn is 'iconic' New Zealand ceramics and while some of it is pretty kitch there were some lovely pieces too. This exhibition is definitely worth the $6 entry fee.

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